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What Is Spam Musubi?

If you really like know what is spam musubi, check out this video by this 6-year old master. But here's my amateur take on "what is spam musubi?" I going break it down in to components starting with the musubi. To me, musubi is plain steamed rice, usually white rice, packed in to a triangle ball shape. Sorry, "triangle ball" is the best I could come up with. Check out the Tasty Island blog post on Manabu to see what I mean by "triangle ball." For spam musubi, the rice is usually shaped in a rectangle cube. Hah? I know, I should've paid more attention in geometry class then I could describe the shapes more better. Maybe more better just watch the video. Anyways, people usually put salted water on the hands when shaping the musubi to give it some flavor and so the rice no stick to the hands.

Let's move on to the spam component. From what I can tell, Spam is canned mystery meat product. The spam is sliced about quarter inch thickness, then fried in shoyu sugar sauce. I heard some people fry the spam first until slightly crispy, then they dip it in shoyu sugar sauce. There seems to be a wide variety of techniques. I even heard one guy say his Uncle marinate the spam overnight in shoyu and fruit juice before frying. That's hardcore spam-a-lama action...go Uncle.

Finally the two components come together as one. Nori is the unifying force in spam musubi. The prepared spam is popped on top of the rectangle cube shape rice. Btw, the rectangle cube rice gotta be sized up to the piece of spam so she fit nicely on top. Then the nori wraps around everything creating a tight little package. Not too tight, not too loose, but just right.

The unification process is complete only if the ratio of spam to rice is in harmonious balance. Too much rice and too little spam she taste bland. Too thick spam and manini rice is salty spam overdose. I guess everybody get their own variations and ratios depending on personal taste. Some people put the spam in the middle of the rice. Some folks put furikake in theirs. Others add the egg and takuan inside for extra flavor surprise. I like to dip mine in ketchup with each bite.

For a way better explanation of spam musubi, check out Secrets to Making Spam Musubi on House of Annie food blog. I think this blogger is the same guy who made this video.